Greg du Toit – Wildlife Photographer

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Greg du Toit – Wildlife Photographer

Greg du Toit – Wildlife Photographer lured the world as part of the 2009 BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, while another image titled ‘Black Rhino Forest’ received a Gerald Durrell Endangered Wildlife Award in the 2010 BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Born in South Africa in 1977, he has lived and worked in four different African countries. From a young age, he has engaged the wilds of Africa, and there was never any doubt as to what he would do with his life. It was therefore no surprise that after completing his tertiary education in Nature Conservation, he went to live permanently in the African bush…now available through Conference Speakers International

The first few years of his career were spent in Timbavati Game Reserve (South Africa), where he served an apprenticeship as a Wilderness Trails Guide. It was during these years that he set aside devoted time to study every aspect of the African bush, including identifying as many species of wild flowers, trees, grasses and dung beetles as possible! His days were spent stalking Africa’s big game on foot and these skills later proved invaluable as he focused his attention on wildlife photography. You can follow Greg on Twitter

Greg du Toit - African Wildlife Photographer

Since those early days, he has gone on to photograph some of Africa’s wildest, remotest and largest ecosystems! His artwork has hung in both the London and Sydney natural history museums and his ‘Authentic Africa’ collections have been exhibited across the globe, from New York to Singapore!

African wildlife is his specialty, while his preferred genre is fine art wildlife photography, whereby his photographic works are easily recognized by the tangible mood, primitive energy and vibrant colours that they convey.

These intimate interactions with the natural world, skillfully composed and captured in-camera, have brought him international acclaim. He was recently invited to exhibit his work for the National Geographic Society in London and Singapore respectively, where his solo exhibit, titled ‘Africa’, sold out in its first month before being extended.

The London gallery hosted an unprecedented 40 000 visitors per day!

Greg also regularly receives honors in the most prestigious wildlife competitions in the world. His image titled ‘Crossing Frenzy’ toured the world as part of the 2009 BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, while another image titled ‘Black Rhino Forest’ received a Gerald Durrell Endangered Wildlife Award in the 2010 BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

He is also honored to have recently co-judged a photographic competition hosted by Africa Geographic magazine and alongside fellow judges Peter and Beverly Pickford.

PRESENTATION:

More about Just Jump In:

Both the story and the accompanying visuals leave audiences stunned and invigorated as they come to terms with this world-class photographer’s passion for wildlife – a passion that extends way beyond the realms of what would be classified as normal or safe. His story of perseverance motivates and inspires both corporate companies and individuals alike to achieve the impossible through resourcefulness, passion, dogged determination, appreciation and above all else, patience.

Greg du Toit - African Wildlife Photographer
Greg du Toit – African Wildlife Photographer

Just Jump In is a highly original presentation that includes a literal feast of unbelievable wildlife imagery as the photographer shares his extensive knowledge of one of Africa’s wildest regions, deep within the heart of Maasailand. Audiences are offered insight into the patience, passion, commitment and dedication that it takes for a wildlife photographer in the 21st century to capture truly unique imagery. The personable style of the presentation as well as the infectious story itself, motivates audiences on a deeply personal level and there is also time afterwards for questions and answers. We invite you to come partake in another man’s ‘against all odds’ quest to accomplish the impossible and to find out how images that Greg captured in a remote corner of Africa, lead to a sellout solo exhibition with the National Geographic Society in London and to a cover story for the Africa Geographic Magazine.

To make your evening or event extra special, Greg offers an exclusive book signing for his latest coffee table book titled ‘African Wildlife Exposed’ at each talk. An exhibit or charity auction can also be arranged.
‘Just Jump In’ has received exposure the world over with Greg having delivered this presentation as far afield as northern Finland. The BBC Worldwide Service, Radio 702 and both local and international newspapers have interviewed Greg about his story. He has also appeared on live CNBC television in New York.

Greg du Toit is an 8th generation African and a professional wildlife photographer who stands out from the crowd. Not only is his work easily recognized by the tangible mood, primitive energy and vibrant colours that it conveys, but his dynamic collections represent scenes captured in the camera, as opposed to being digitally manipulated on a computer afterwards. His work has hung in the London and Sydney Natural History Museums and his fine art collections have travelled the globe with exhibits having been hosted in New York, Singapore and London. His work is widely published in magazines including Africa Geographic and the BBC Wildlife Magazine and he regularly clinches awards in the most prestigious photographic competitions in the world. You can see a selection of his published work here…

Greg du Toit - African Wildlife Photographer
Greg du Toit – African Wildlife Photographer

Greg du Toit – African Wil
Greg du Toit – Wildlife Photographer dlife Photographer

Wildlife magazine

I was thrilled to receive a commission from the BBC Wildlife Magazine to compile a portfolio on the African Leopard. The 13 page spread appeared in the October 2012 issue.

Africa Geographic

It was a lovely surprise to see my image grace the cover of the June 2012 issue of  the Africa Geographic Magazine.

(I took the image in the Serengeti and in an attempt to show the vastness of the plains, I thought what better way, than to use the landscape to dwarf the largest land mammal on planet earth…)